Making armor

Materials

High-tech materials

These are the stuff you probably should make your armor out of. They provide good stopping power for their weight, but tend to be expensive.

Ballistic fibers

Kevlar, etc. The baseline for soft armor materials.

High-grade steel

Heavy, but good stopping power if you use enough of it. The gold standard of hard armor material.

Ceramics

Double the stopping power of high-grade steel, but degrades very quickly.

Polymer panels

Stopping power equal to high-grade steel, degrades at equal rate, light weight but very bulky. Best suited for light armor, but impossible to use in covert armor and extremely bulky in heavy armor.

Low-tech materials

You probably shouldn’t use this stuff for making armor, but hey, it might be better than nothing.

Low-grade steel

Steel that was not made to stop bullets.

Plastics

The stopping power of plastics varies, but is generally low.

Stopping power

These stopping powers assume the armor is made out of high-grade steel or ballistic fibers, depending on whether the armor is hard or soft.

Helmets

A helmet covers the Head area which is represented by hit locations 05-10. Some helmets incorporate a visor to cover the face, hit locations 01-04, or cover the entire face with an opaque helmet and transmit a view of the outside world to the user with cameras and screens.

Common helmet SPs:
Steel helmet: SP 14
Old composite helmet: SP 20
Modern composite helmet: SP 30(20)*

  • A helmet that does not possess a method for transmitting the kinetic energy of a hit beyond the head itself can not offer more than SP 20 protection. If used as a cover it is, however, capable of offering that 30SP it is rated against. A helmet which is connected to the shoulders of the armor does not have this limitation, but does impose 1 EV. The term for such a helmet is a Great Helm.

Visors

A visor is a simple way to protect the face without blinding the user. It is also a great way to look like a dork who has just pissed his pants or a goon. A visor covers the hit locations 01-04.

Common visor SPs:
Plastic visor: SP 6
Baseline visor: SP 8
Premium visor: SP 10

A full helmet might technically be described as a visor that has the same SP as the helmet proper. Such helmets typically include a built in sensor suite (pick and mix from [Cybereye] extras list).

Torso

Protecting the torso is usually the first priority when armoring up since torso covers the most hit locations, includes 5 hit locations worth of Vitals and generally torso armors have high stopping power. The torso is represented by the hit locations 11-15, which are vital, and the hit locations 16-30 which are not quite as vital. Torso armor comes in following four weight categories:

Clothing

Clothing armor covers those forms of clothing which offer a measure of protection from damage.

Common clothing SPs:
Typical leather/denim jacket: SP 2
Thick leather jacket: SP 4
Clothing reinforced with ballistic fibers: SP 6

Covert

Cover armor covers those forms of armor which can be worn under an outer garment without them being readily apparent.

Common covert armor SPs:
Light ballistic vest: SP 10
Medium ballistic vest: SP 14

Light

Light armor covers those forms of armor which are too bulky to be hidden but do not significantly hinder the wearer’s mobility.

Common light armor SPs:
Heavy ballistic vest: SP 18

Heavy

Heavy armor covers those forms of armor which significantly hinder the wearer’s mobility. They also offer the best protection against ballistic attacks.

Common heavy armor SPs:
Very Heavy ballistic vest: SP 24, EV 2
Trauma Plate: SP 30, EV 1/side*
Clamshell Torso Plate: SP 30, EV 3

  • A trauma plate is the most common form of heavy armor. It covers only the Vitals, hit locations 11-15, but it has a very high SP of 30 and can be simply slipped into most ballistic vests when the situation calls for extra protection. One trauma plate only protects the wearer from hits from either front or back: two are needed if you want to guard against attacks from both directions.

Arms and Legs

The right arm is represented by the hit locations 41-55. The left arm is represented by the hit locations 56-70. The right leg is represented by the hit locations 71-85. The left leg is represented by the hit locations 86-00. Arms and legs are the hardest to protect from attack due to the joints and the needs to avoid excessive limits on the range of motion or weight. On the other hand cybernetic prostheses are cheap so maybe it is not that much of a priority…

Common clothing SPs:
Jeans: SP 2
Heavy Leather Jacket: SP 4
Clothing reinforced with ballistic fibers: SP 6

Common covert armor SPs:
Light ballistic fibers: SP 8

Common light armor SPs:
Medium ballistic fibers: SP 10

Common heavy armor SPs:
Heavy ballistic fibers: SP 14, EV 1 per pair of limbs
Armored plate, half limb: SP 20/25 (Arms/Legs), EV 1 per pair of limbs*
Articulated plate, whole limb: SP 20/25 (Arms/Legs), EV 1 per pair of limb

  • This unusual piece of armor covers half of the with SP 20/25 (Arms/Legs) armored plates and the other half with SP 12 heavy ballistic fibers. On the right arm the plates cover hit locations 41-46 and the heavy ballistic fibers cover hit location 47-55. On the left arm the plates cover hit locations 56-61 and the heavy ballistic fibers cover hit location 62-70. On the right leg the plates cover hit locations 77-85 and the heavy ballistic fibers cover hit location 70-76. On the left leg the plates cover hit locations XX-00 and the heavy ballistic fibers cover hit location 86-92.

Making armor

Edgerunner Kohme Kohme